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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
foreigners to raise ranso. foreign policy cheep kathryn ashton said the e.u. is committed to finding a political solution to stop the bloodshed in syria the >> of course we're looking to see how best we can increase assistance to the political groups and we continue to put as much pressure as probably -- possible and to increase our pressure on the regime to put pressure to participate in a meaningful political process. >> a funeral more a top supporters of foreign policy ch ashton said the e.u. is committed to finding a political solution president as has taken place in damascus. more than 41 people died in the explosion. the government blamed rebel fighters for the attack. plenty more still to come on al-jazeera, including a tornado that left death and destruction. >> hello again, a reminder of the main stories here. a orts that an agreement for 20% tax on accounts over $130,000 in cyprus and 4% on others. nd the funeral of a main supporter of president assad has taken place in damascus. putin's most -- biggest critics has been found lead in london. berezovsky's death is being trea
'll come back and talk more about that and what it meant fo american foreign policy going forward. we continue our discussion on this tenth anniversary of the iraqi war with the distinguished panel of people who observed and written about the war sinces beginning. from cambridge, glrngd john burns, the london bureau chief of the "new york times." in new york, michael gordon, chiefch military correspondent r the "new york times." fouad ajami, a senior fellow of the hoomp institution. dexter filkins of the "new yorker" we hope will be joining us shortly. i go back to michael gordon.ly tell me what the judgment of history will be about our participation in the iraqi war. >> i think too much attentionwa has been paid to the decision tc go to war and not enough on the management of the withdrawal from iraq and where we go from here with iraq. because the story of iraq is not over. and we shouldn't just put thisov chapter behind us and say we're done with it. there were opportunities to be engaged with iraq by the u.s. government on the level of common citizens. there's a tbalt for influenc
, and what it means for american foreign policy.me joining me is michael gordon.jo he is chief military correspondent for the "new york times." his new book is called "end game: theis inside story of the struggle for iraq." i am pleased to have him here back a this table. welcome. good to see you. >> glad to be here. >> rose: this is, many are say, the detailed history from t the military point of view of the iraqi war. is that a fair assessment? >> well, it-- i started out to do, that but actually, i did a little more than that in this sense-- i had a coauthor, general trainer -- a >> who you worked with before. >> i started out to do a book on the surge which i had covered before the surge, during the surge, and after the surge, onng the ground inraq, and i concluded you couldn't really evaluate the surge until youal knew what was policy was before the surge and you couldn't evaluate whether the surge worked or didn't until you found out what happened afterwards. it became kind of a political military. and one thing i did try to do which a lot of american authors haven't done, frankl
that chemical agents have been used. senator lindsey graham spoke about the allegations telling foreign policy that quote this. we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapons sites either in conjunction with our partners or, if nothing else, by ourselves. if the choice is to send in troops to secure the weapons sites versus allowing chemical weapons to get in the hands of some of the most violent people in the world, i vote to cut this off before it becomes a problem. but following intelligence briefings, the chairs of both the house and senate intelligence committee said they believe president bashar al assad has crossed the so-called red line in the civil war. >> i think the days are becoming mow desperate. the regime is more desperate. we know where the chemical weapons are. there's no secret that they are there. i think the probabilities are very high that we are going into some very dark times and i think the white house needs to be prepared. >> i have a high probability to believe that chemical weapons were used. we need that final verification but given everything we know over t
next, house foreign affairs committee chairman ed royce talks about u.s. policy towards the asia-pacific region including u.s. relations with china and north korea's nuclear program. then former national security adviser brzezinski discusses the situation in iraq at a forum marking the tenth anniversary of the war. and later, former state and treasury department officials discuss the orange of the islamic militant -- origin of the islamic militant group hezbollah and its global terrorist threat. >> also today retired general john allen who commanded forces in afghanistan discusses the progress of the war during his command and the future mission of the u.s. and nato in the country. general allen led the forces in afghanistan for 19 months from mid 2011 through february of this year. he'll be hosted by the brookings institution, and you can see his remarks live later in this morning at 10 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> tonight on "first ladies," called a bigamist and adulterer during her husband's 1828 presidential campaign, rachel jackson chis of an -- dies of an apparent heart attac
on that journey with. that is trying to figure out what our foreign policy is. i have had a very hard time doing that. i am stumped on the answer in syria. i do not know what the answer is. we have waited so long to really do anything. it reminds me of iran in 2009 and we saw an opportunity against the regime. i find ourselves in a situation now where i do feel like we are reacting to this situation and if we go back to the beginning of the conflict and the net -- and the initial uprising of assad, you have the iran receive supporting the syrian regime on the one hand, and syrian fighter -- freedom fighters on the other hand. at that time, you could assume extremism would not have the ability to organize to this -- to the great extent they probably organize now. at the beginning, and i am asking yolks because you're at -- asking you because you were at these compositions, against a regime that is a supported obama -- supported by iran? i will keep it short because there is a lot i want to ask. >> to be very brief, congressman, i, personally, do not agree we waited so long. we were helping democr
and director of the foreign policy program at the brookings institution in washington, d.c. and david makovsky is the director of the project on the middle east peace process at the washington institute for near east policy. welcome to both of you. martin, let me start with you. as the president goes to israel, what will he find in general terms in this new government? what do we know or not know? >> well, it's only a couple of days old. so it's a very hard to tell exactly what it's going to shape up to. what we have is right wing party with a shift within the likud further in the right in terms of its composition. we have a large center party, lapid, this new rising star. then to his left is tzipi livni who was the only candidate to campaign on the two-state solution. he only got 56. >> brown: somehow they all worked together or were supposed to work together. >> there's a special glue on the seats of israeli cabinet chairs which kind of keep them stuck there for a while at least. they have to respond to their constituency. that is the key point here. their constituents wants them to focus on
whether it's on the road with the secretary of state or here in washington where i cover foreign policy, and that's what motivated me to write "the secretary," to sort of take a step back and digest everything i had seen and learned. i had learned a lot being in this front row seat to history, to diplomacy. watching all those different events unfold. and writing book was a very maturing experience as well as i digested, as you say, some of what i had seen and tried to come to some of the conclusions that i was trying to get at. but when it comes to the secretary of state and the people around her, i think that what i found striking is her ability to stay focused at all times as much as possible on what is happening. she doesn't get distracted by the details if they're not important. obviously, details often matter. but she has an ability to stay focused on the big picture. how is what is happening in afghanistan impacting what they might be doing in the middle east? how is what is happening in the middle east impacting what they're trying to do in asia? i think she had a good sense of w
: joining me martin indyk, director of foreign policy brookings institution, also a former u.s. ambassador to israel. and itamar rabinovich served as israel ambassador to the united states. at the same time he was chief negotiator with the syrian government and president and founder of the israeli institute. i'm pleased to have both of them at this table, at this time, when the president i saying some very interesting things in israel. so welcome. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> rose: characterize this speech by the president. >> this speech was typical obama at his best, working his oratorical magic on a crowd that lapped it up. he spoke very convincingly about his commitment to israel's security and his understanding of their security dilemmas. and particularly underlined what he was going to prevent iran from getting nuclear weaponsment buthen he went into a rif about peace and the necessity of peace and the possibility of peace, and why peace has to be just, even saying put yourself, you israelis put yourself in the shoes of the palestinians. and talked over the heads of the leadership
dominated politics on three issues -- foreign policy, taxes, and social issues. among social issues, they won the battle and lost the war. there is no single social issue in your favor going forward. on taxes, you stand for giving breaks to the rich. they didreign policy, not support the bush foreign policy, so the stoll that made that republican party dominant come all three issues are in democratic favre. until you deal with these problems, it does not matter until network -- it does not matter what network you have. conservatives and, smaller government, less intrusion, and with they will have to figure out how to mollify the social movement. >> i do not think anyone has suggested the only thing that republicans are waiting right now is doing any better data bases and do we need more storefront offices. i was responding to a question directly about that. there is a lot of discussion going on right now about positioning, policies, looking for some of integrating new program pauses, how do we explain our policies better. i do not accept the premise that there is no doubt when you l
those ones relative to foreign policy end up sometimes driving the most passionate dust up. but look, we have four great senators that you've mentioned there. they all have very differing ideas. they are all part of our caucus and bring a lot to it. i think it's time to move on and focus on those things that unite us. look, i really do think it's healthy that people are being as outspoken as they are right now, and hopefully that will lead to some unification down the road. >> senator corker, always good to have you here in "the situation room." thank you. >> thank you. >>> there are very few places left in new york where you can smoke them, and now mayor michael bloomberg wants to make it so you can't see them. up next, controversy over his plan to force stores to hide cigarettes. i don't make any decisions about who to hire without going to angie's list first. you'll find reviews on home repair to healthcare written by people just like you. with angie's list, i know who to call, and i know the results will be fantastic. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. >>> he's gone after trans f
levin, chairman of the armed services committee, and u.s. defense and foreign policy. later a discussion on expanding coverage under the health care law for the lgbt community. >> president obama is set to arrive in israel on wednesday, followed by a was -- a visit to the west bank and a final stop in jordan, during his first overseas trip in his second term. two former middle east advisers discussed theouse president's trip. from the washington institute, this is 90 minutes. >> good afternoon. and welcome to the washington institute. i am the director of the institute. i'm very happy to welcome all of you today. just at the outside, if i could remind you, cell phone off please. not just on a vibrate. this event is being live streamed for our thousands of fans around the world. the event is being broadcast by c-span. -- say ng you can say can and will be used against you. we are gathered here today because president obama is off for the inaugural overseas visit of his second term. east,going to the middle israel, to the west bank, and to jordan. his itinerary is very different than the i
politics than with foreign-policy. but there is this session it will never happen, but it could happen. to protect israel in a credible fashion, if we wish, by guarantees which are as binding or or more binding than those we get to the europeans and those to the japanese and south koreans. and this is a country which does not have the opportunity to threaten us directly. at the same time, we should not lose sight that if we do repeat iran, what we did vis-À-vis iraq, we will probably engaged in a conflict that is more protracted and more regionally widespread than was the case with iraq a decade ago? so these are some of the concerns from history. let me make one more observation about the nature of war. toker sees are very able wage total war if they are attacked. they are not so good. they're not read this post. they are mentally not prepared to wage total war if they started they were themselves but were not attacked. difference.ortant we were able to break the will of the germans in large measure by massive air assaults on their civilian population. yes, of course, it was justifie
of improvement, but the unemployment rate remains elevated. the house foreign affairs committee examines of the u.s. to the syrian civil war. ben bernanke on monetary policy. a news conference with president obama and prime minister netanyahu. >> 70,000 people have been killed since protests began again syrian president assad. u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford, testified at a house foreign affairs committee along with state department and usaid officials examining the u.s. response to the syrian civil war. this is two hours and 15 minutes. >> this hearing will come to order to sto. we need to review the syrian crisis. it was two years ago last week on the nightly news that we saw those protesters walking through .he street, chanting, peaceful what the world saw next without the syrian forces opened up with small arms fire on the marchers. over the ensuing weeks, that was followed by materially -- artillery barrage is and tanks and aerial apartment and finally i scud missiles into cities. two years into that syria and uprising. years, u.s. policy has been a drift. the obama administration saw
at eastern on c-span and c-span3, c-span radio, and c-span.org. >> now, the house foreign committee affairs allied u.s. policy toward the asia pacific region and of relations with china. he talks about north korea's's nuclear program, trade agreements, and india's role in the region. from the heritage foundation, this is about one hour. >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. days, thext 13 president of the heritage foundation. i am delighted to have with us as amorning my successor new president, senator jim demint. we're happy you are here to join us. to theme all of you auditorium. it's good to see so many friends here and particularly a happy occasion for us to be able to co-host the reception afterward with the ambassador of the the republic of korea. it's very special time for korea to celebrate the first anniversary of chorus and we celebrate and commemorate the 60th anniversary of the end of the korean war. today, we have a number of other significant guests who are here with us representing the samsung company from their new jersey headquarters, mr. m.j. han and welcome you here on
right here. >> ticket. -- thank you. since the president is taking his first foreign trip to the middle east, how do you see his policy and can he achieve something in his second term? >> i'm hoping to keep the focus on the big question before us, which is the lessons of a decade of war. general that the mentioned how war does not often turn out the way you want it to, as the air battle concept would be too much towards. how owards that direction, did that shift resources away from europe and asia in the 2000's? >> you said regarding one of the, with in history, 3 packets of a regime but they were doing this for 3 decades. it's only in the end that the u.s. learned of weapons. the regime was brutal all the time. >> we have the whole world on a table. onhow has our expenditures iraq affected our ability to operate elsewhere? the united states is the number one superpower. we have the largest economy. so we manage to remain engaged in other parts of the world. but that does not refer to the proposition that the war iraq was excessively expensive, not only morally but financially and physi
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)